Posts tagged: oprah winfrey

@CareerEngineer shares Tips on TV — Getting BACK To Work!

September and October are the BIGGEST months to make that change, move up or move out. New job orders are out, companies are interviewing and hiring for professional and para-professional opportunities.  So “Never Fear — The Career Engineer   is here...to share some TCE Tips to “Get BACK in the Grind and Get Back to Work.   My TCE tips shared below can  be help you “make some movements.”

In the spirit of making a move….what’s your most inspiring job search or job changing experience?  You never know you could share something here, that could be a blessing or eye opener for someone else. (Remember, sharing is caring…let’s help folks to get back to work).

  • Do You KNOW Your WOW Factor? A REAL Self Assessment including Pitfalls are Critical.  Remember You “Can’t SELL What You Don’t Know”

 

  • Do You have 30 Second SELL Factor: Action Words, Performance Numbers, and Completed Tasks! Hint: If you have the following words in your brand :  responsible, depending, team player and reliable…you are doomed!

 

  • Do You KNOW Your Target? Research companies & create your Top 10 – 30 – 50 List.  Anywhere and everywhere is not a strategic job search…it’s a wish!  Buckle down and learn to develop your OWN market…that what Oprah, Bill, Warren and Mark…did!

 

 

The Career Engineer

“Don’t Get Anxious – Get Prepared” The Career Engineer: http://TCEnow.com Email: info@TCEnow.com 757-745-4TCE , Twitter @CareerEngineer and #periscope

 

 

Happily Employed 101: Decide Who You Are BEFORE Deciding What You’ll DO!

The Career Engineer

As of June 2014, approximately 9.5 million Americans are unemployed in the United States. As a re-careering employee you may be wondering, “In this 21st century labor market, is it possible to have the “American Dream” and be successful in the workforce and in life?” Absolutely! The proof is in the person. Look at Oprah, Bill Gates, Tyler Perry, and Sam Walton. They’ve found the way. In a nutshell, they focused on their potential, not the economic indicators.  Successful people discovered who they were “BEFORE” they decided what they would do. It’s deeper than a job with these folks. It’s about delivering their passion, purpose, personality, and potential. I’m convinced that the individuals listed above no longer have to go to work everyday. They work hard, but their careers have become another dimension of their personalities pushed beyond the “average” functioning levels. Successful people consistently strive to produce at 100 percent utilizing a true blend of purpose and occupation.

What about the rest of us, can we attain that level of synergy in our professional career and life?   Absolutely. However, understand that success does not come without cost. Our cost, we must make a personal commitment to explore ourselves at deeper levels than we ever imagined. The actual price is the authentic desire to uncover our wants and needs, in order to let go of old habits, and gain new experiences.   I challenge you, find out who you are “before” deciding what you’ll do.  The next seven steps to self-discovery that follow will help you to discover who you are in work and in life. Remember, it’s deeper than a job…it’s about discovering “you.”

  1. Accept Who You Are: The ability to be comfortable in your own skin, and to find your  own niche, is a must for today’s competitive world. There is no one on this planet just like you. Learn to embrace and accept your originality, your body composition, the hue of your complexion, your voice, your essence, and your professional style. Once you have accepted “who you are,” you can begin to share “what you bring” to the workforce, relationships, and the world. Your unique “brand”is a selling point that you must deliver in all of your networking experiences. Be the pacesetter who drives class and style. Set your standards and leave the crowd behind.  TCE Power Statement: Failure Happens When You Try To Become Something You Are Not.
  1. Tap into Your Gifts and Talents:   If you don’t like something, you won’t do it very well. In order to find your “fit” with a particular employer, you need to explore your interests, desires, natural gifts and acquired talents. Consider the following questions and write your responses. In what areas of your life have you received compliments with minimal efforts? What do you enjoy? What relaxes you? What would you do for free? How do you feel when you are doing “that” activity? Do you “dream out loud?” How would you describe your ideal environment? If all of your debts were paid, and you could do anything in the world, what would it be?  Your answers may open the door for you to discover the best fit for your personality in the work environment. For instance, I enjoy helping people discover themselves. I need flexible, relaxed environments, open spaces, vibrant colors, limited supervision, and the ability to “go with it.” I would not be successful working in the Patent and Copyright Office for the Federal Government (even if it’s a GS-12 position), there are too many limitations. The result of an improper fit is friction, in which case, poor performance and/or termination would likely follow. TCE Power Statement: In The World of Success or Failure, Your Fit Makes The Difference.
  1. Discover Your Strengths/Know Your Limitations: You can’t sell what you don’t know. Let’s uncover your power. Consider the following examples to start your strength building process.  Are you comfortable speaking in front of groups, keen with numbers, academically solid, business savvy, or an excellent leader? Don’t discount your soft skills (compassion, drive, patience), combine them with the hard skills listed above. To determine your limitations, use the same techniques as above to find areas that are underdeveloped and need strengthening.   Once you have completed the above task, sell your strengths and minimize your limitations. Example: Strength: communication skills, Limitation: rapid speech (by product of a Yankee upbringing). Plan – be aware and conscious of speech rate while delivering my messages. No one will know, employer or otherwise, the areas of your life that need work, unless you decide to tell them. TCE Power statement: The Road To Success Is Always Under Construction.  
  1. Declare What You Don’t Want to Do: Fact:I don’t like okra. Therefore, I don’t eat okra, I enjoy collards instead. If you don’t like something, stop pursuing it. First step, declare 3 areas that you have “zero” interest in working.Let your flood gates open and list the industries, environments, job titles for which you have “zero” interest. Next step, do not apply for an opportunity in any of the areas you have listed in this exploration. If you don’t want to work nights and weekends, then don’t pursue the service industry (management or otherwise). If you have a more circular personality and need freedom and energy from others, don’t look for opportunities in a linear environment where order and routine is the norm. Your declarations will release you to pursue those areas where your interest, gifts, talents, and strengths can shine. Retention is more important than recruitment. TCE Power statement: When You Love What You Do, You Will Never be Forced to Go to Work Everyday.
  1. Acknowledge Your Power Source: In our academic pursuits, relationships, and work lives most of our actions are determined by some form of motivation.   In other words, “if I do this…what’s in it for me?”   Find the origins of your motivation, consider these questions. Are you internally or externally focused? What motivates your successes? What compels you to select particular programs? What drives you? What fuels your passion? What keeps you connected to the things you love to do? Knowing where your passion originates is a career selling point. Some industries are looking for internal motivation, (helping profession, education, sciences, and arts). Other industries need the externally motivated, (PR/marketing, entertainment, business, legal profession). A quick note of caution, understand that your “fuel source” must be replenished or you will run on empty. The technical term for not refueling is “burnout”– don’t let it happen to you.  TCE Power Statement: Find Your Life’s Work Not a Work Life!
  1. Deliver Your Ambition and Accomplishments: Today’s employers are looking for that top 10 – 30% employee who can perform in the marketplace. Make sure you have what it takes to meet their needs—be a “performer”, not just a “presenter.” Be an “employee”, not just a “candidate.” Expect HR associates to dig deeper and ask questions regarding performance, achievements, initiative and leadership potential. Hiring managers and recruiters are aware that candidates can “shine” in a one-hour interview, but what about the long haul? You must make sure that your career search tools combine what you can do, with what you’ve got. You must showcase your accomplishments, how you achieved them, and your next steps.   Be prepared to demonstrate your contributions, projects managed, and how you “stepped out of the boat” at various levels (individual, group, community). To have nothing… won’t do.   If you are struggling in the performance/accomplishment area, now is the time to “get on top of that.” Get involved and become active in the community. Join professional groups and associations. Find volunteer opportunities that meet your life mission and academic standards. Don’t just take a back seat, secure a position of leadership and develop those skills and accomplishments. Power Statement: Work Like You Have a Purpose.
  1. Manage “Your” Business: Successful people see themselves as an enterprise; they act and think like a business. They value performance, change management, accomplishments, quality, self-management, time-management, community service, and reputation. You are a business—an enterprise with a quality based product line, and skilled knowledge base. Your resume should function as your brochure, highlighting your strengths and minimizing your limitations. Your interviews are to be considered “sales” meeting where you share your core products (passion, purpose, personality, potential, and performance) with a potential vendor. Your image, dress, and conduct should be consistent with your business standards. Your follow-up contact (thank you letter and/or follow-up call) will close the deal, and leave a lasting professional impression on the employer.   Membership does have its privileges. Join the “Top 10 – 30% Club” or settle for the average career seeker club…you decide. TCE Power Statement: Your Reputation Will Outweigh a Resume Any Day!

Copyright © June 2014 by Francina R. Harrison, MSW

 

Francina R. Harrison, MSW The Career Engineer® (TCE) is an National Career, Business & eNetworking Expert, Author, Speaker, TV/Radio personality and the visionary behind the award-winning www.TCEnow.com The Career Engineer’s expertise has been featured on the TJMS, Tavis Smiley Show, BlackEnterprise.com, Chicago Tribune, Fox TV, NBC affiliates & hundreds of sites on the Internet.   Contact TCE @ 757-745-4823 or info@tcenow.com

 

 

WordPress Themes

%d bloggers like this: